Making Knowledge Accessible by Any Means Necessary

Over time, I have come to gather more knowledge on the various things that pique my interest, and as of late, I find myself intrigued & in awe of those that have to go up against unfathomable obstacles when trying to attain their education around the world.

While taking some time to delve deeper into this curiosity, I came across articles and various forms of media that focused on individuals seeking to better themselves in this very way, even by what I would consider ‘any means necessary’.

Last month, I came across an article that focused on a person in particular that I would truly enjoy meeting  in this lifetime…”Raul Lemesoff, an eccentric artist in Buenos Aires, Argentina, has created a bizarre tank-like ‘Weapon Of Mass Instruction’ (Arma de Instruccion Masiva) that he intends to use to battle ignorance and spread knowledge.” –(Borepnada.com)

You can read the full article here.

As I continued with my self guided search I learned even more. In other parts of the world you have educators that are inspiring learning all while gliding down swollen waterways…rivers that are taking over communities due to climate change. These changes are impacting these regions due to ongoing flooding, especially during the monsoon season.

Floating schools, like this one in Bangladesh, are used to reach remote communities.
Floating schools like this one in Bangladesh, are used to reach remote communities.

–(Floating schools are being promoted as one way of adapting to climate change in Bangladesh. CNN’s Dan Rivers reports.)

A PINK floating school moored at a community of houses on stilts in Bongao town, Tawi-Tawi province, stands as a beacon of hope for Badjao children, who have little access to education in the country.
A PINK floating school moored at a community of houses on stilts in Bongao town, Tawi-Tawi province, stands as a beacon of hope for Badjao children, who have little access to education in the country.

Some topics that inspire the educator’s lessons center around every day task. “Panaglasa Sahiduan, a Badjao, said her children usually got shortchanged when they sold fresh catch in the neighborhood and at the public market…“My kids are learning not only words and numbers but also how to do business like selling fish. They know how many fish is equivalent to a certain price,” Panaglasa Sahiduan Giya said.” –(Inquirer Mindanao)

–(Rights to Education and Safe City, Batch Nine students of the Department of Media and Communication (DMC) of the Royal University of Phnom Penh as part of their Multimedia Journalism class.)

If you’re interested in learning more about the innovative ways in which technology is being used in some floating schools you can do so by listening  to Mohammed Rezwan, as he goes into more detail in regards to the affects that climate change is having on particular regions in Bangladesh; featured in this 18 minute video that I have shared below.

Then as I dug a bit deeper, I learned about the floating schools in Nigeria. One such school has three floors that tower above the lagoon that it sways on.

In addition to boats, some students even take to the air in order to gain access to the knowledge they seek.  It’s said that, “With favourable tail winds, the journey can take as little as 47 seconds.”

Loganair: Six teenagers are to take the Loganair service to Westray Junior High after the local ferry service was suspended. Photo: ORKNEY PHOTOGRAPHIC
Loganair: Six teenagers are to take the Loganair service to Westray Junior High after the local ferry service was suspended. Photo: ORKNEY PHOTOGRAPHIC

Lastly, a few months back I saw the most peculiar job posting featured at this link.

Nicholas Reilly for Metro.co.uk
Nicholas Reilly for Metro.co.uk

As I read more about the story featured in an online article by the Metro.co.uk, I learned that, “In the advert for the position, Scoraig Primary School stresses that prospective applicants must have an ‘adventurous spirit’ and feel comfortable in the peninsula’s ‘wild and raw environment.’”, as well, “The Scoraig community was first established in the 1960s and consists of 40 houses, alongside a village hall – while a postman only visits the peninsula three times a week.”

Don’t you find it amazing what others must endure in order to gain access to something many people in the western world take for granted…it gives an entirely new meaning to the term “distance learning”. In closing, I must say that I’m fortunate enough to know better and that I take every opportunity I can in furthering my knowledge about such matters as well as simply pushing myself to learn more as I continue in my endeavors as a life long learner.

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